Are There More Antioxidants In Organic Food?

Are There More Antioxidants In Organic Food?

by Martha Berkesch


Vegetables have lots of antioxidants.

Antioxidants destroy free radicals that are thought to cause many diseases such as heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer. Many of the antioxidants in foods are what gives them their color. Each vegetable has many different beneficial properties, many of which haven’t been studied or even discovered. Getting food from a CSA and eating seasonally ensures that you get different nutrients every time you eat a different vegetable. I don’t know about you, but during the winter I end up buying the same vegetables and don’t branch out. Getting a CSA share pushes you to experiment with foods you may not normally buy and to try different vegetables.


Related: How To Change A Belief


Being organic, vegetables from Cosmic Apple have more antioxidants than conventionally-grown produce you get at the grocery store, up to 40% more according to the Quality Food Low Input Project. Why is that? As vegetables grow and ripen, the vitamins and antioxidants increase. When a vegetable is picked when it is ripe, it has reached its full nutrition potential. If it’s picked before it’s ripe and it doesn’t have its full possible color, it also doesn’t have as many nutrients. Tomatoes picked green and then sprayed with gas to ripen them at least a week later have far fewer antioxidants (and don’t taste as good) than tomatoes allowed to ripen on the vine.

Because locally-grown produce doesn’t have to be shipped far, it can be picked when it is ripe. Instead of buying vegetables that were picked unripe a week before, traveled on a truck for a few days and then sat in the grocery store, you get vegetables that were picked that day or the day before.   Cosmic Apple Gardens takes organic a step further by growing biodynamically as well. A study published in “Biodynamics” in 1999 showed that the antioxidants beta carotene and vitamin C are 14 and 48% higher in biodynamic produce, respectively.

Some antioxidants are destroyed during cooking, especially the water-soluble vitamins C and E. However, other antioxidants actually increase when cooked such as beta-carotene in carrots and lycopene in tomatoes. Generally speaking, griddling (cooking on a pan with no oil) and baking cause the least destruction of antioxidants while frying, boiling and pressure-cooking destroy more antioxidants, although each vegetable is different.


Martha Berkesch

My mission to provide personalized nutrition information for optimal health with a focus on properly preparing food for maximum digestion and restoring gut health. I also provide gut-healing foods such as bone broth, soups, and fermented foods.


*This article was originally publish on Mother Nature Nutrition’s Blog, to learn more or to visit the blog, click here.



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